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Real Estate

Macon-Bibb supports creation of Cotton Avenue Historic District

What do a local dentist and civil rights leader, Capricorn Records, a sloping road, and segregation have in common? They’ve each played a role in the mission to get Cotton Avenue designated as an official Historic District. The Commission is requesting that Macon-Bibb Planning and Zoning designate the area as such.

That dentist and civil rights leader is Dr. D.T. Walton, Sr., and contributions to our community led to a portion of Cotton Avenue being named for him many years ago. That portion of road – which runs from College Street, down by the Government Center, and all the way down Cotton Avenue to Mulberry and 2nd Streets – is what people are hoping will become a historic district.

To read more, click here. 

Former school in East Macon becoming affordable senior housing

For the first time in more than 30 years, a new place for low-income seniors to live is coming to East Macon-Bibb. The Hunt School Village is under construction now, and it will be a 60-unit affordable rental housing development for persons 62 and older.

The $11.8-million-dollar development is possible thanks to partnership between Macon-Bibb County, In-Fill Housing, Inc., the Macon-Bibb County Housing Authority, and Stafford Builders and Consultants. 

District 3 Commissioner Elaine Lucas sees a lot of potential for the entire community because of this development. “This is an example of something wonderful that’s happening where we have this eyesore,” she says.

To read more about the East Macon-Bibb development
and watch a MaconBibbTV feature on this partnership, click here.

Blight money to be used to repurpose empty school, remove blight from neighborhood

Commissioners approved at its March 15 meeting to use $350,000 in blight funds from District 4 to fund the Alexander IV Elementary School Neighborhood Revitalization and Blight Redevelopment Project. The Historic Macon Foundation is purchasing the Alexander IV building on Ridge Avenue from the Bibb County School District, and to develop it into a senior living residence. 

To read the full resolution, click here.

White House initiative expands access to internet

Several organizations are working together as part of the White House’s ConnectHome initiative to make sure children living in public housing have the tools they need to succeed, including fast internet and a working device, whether it’s a laptop or tablet. Macon-Bibb is one of only 28 communities nationwide that that were selected to participate, and partners came together in February to learn how the program was going and how they can be more involved.

Click here to watch a MaconBibbTV feature on the meeting.

For more about the initiative and how you can sign up, click here.

 

 

Holiday safety tips from the Fire Department

During the Holiday Season, the Macon-Bibb County Fire Department would like to offer some turkey fryer operation safety tips to ensure that you and your family have a fun and safe time. To read the full list of tips, visit our website by clicking here. 

“We want everyone to have a happy and safe holiday season,” says Lieutenant Brenda Thomas. “Fire safety starts at home, and with these tips, people can more safely celebrate with friends and family.”

EMA helping families prepare for disasters

September is National Preparedness Month, and the Macon-Bibb Emergency Management Agency (EMA) is participating in FEMA’s national and Georgia’s statewide campaign to help families prepare for any disaster. EMA will educate people through a series of educational meetings, local media coverage, and social media posts about how to be prepared ahead of a disaster, stay safe during a disaster, and recover as quickly as possible following a disaster.

“People should take action now to make sure their friends, family, and pets know how to remain safe during an emergency and how to quickly recover,” says EMA Director Don Druitt.

Electric bus considered for Second Street Corridor

In 2011, Macon began a planning for the redevelopment and revitalization of the Second Street Corridor as a “multi-modal spine” from East Macon and I-16, through Downtown, past Mercer University, and to I-75. It would connect residential areas, businesses, universities, medical facilities, and government facilities to each other while linking two regionally significant facilities, I-16 and I-75.